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Feb. 2018 : 2018 National Juried Photography Exhibition

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NATIONAL JURIED PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION
FACES OF STREETS / William Bullard, Mark Coggins, Karen Klugman, Natsuko Matsumura


PRESS RELEASE

Kenektid X Gallery is pleased to present the 2018 National Juried Photography Exhibition “Faces of Streets” curated by Margaret Tae. The exhibition opens February 27th and continues through March 6th , 2018. The opening reception will be held on Thursday, March 1 st , 2018 from 6-8PM.

In this exhibition, twenty selected artworks of four finalists from 2018 National Juried Photography Exhibition entries chosen by the juror Margaret Tae and the Kenektid X Gallery committee members will be featured. The four finalists, William Bullard, Mark Coggins, Karen Klugman, Natsuko Matsumura, had captured specific moments that might’ve happened but overlooked easily within many intimate scenes of streets in our everyday life. The artists have exquisitely expressed their creativities and aesthetic senses such as lyric emotion, humor or artistic sentiments by capturing and presenting each one’s stylistic photographs.

“Faces of Streets” will run through March 6 th , 2018. Some artists and juror’s will be present at the opening reception on Thursday March 1 st from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday 12:00 – 6:00 PM and by appointment.


FACES OF STREETS / Selected Artworks


K_Bowery, NYC, 2016 ©Karen Klugman

K_Bowery, NYC, 2016 ©Karen Klugman

Karen Klugman

Artist Statement   

Intimacy at Short Notice 

My photographs are urban juxtapositions that meld the personal and political.  When I am taking pictures, I am in a state of high alert, practicing a readiness for images that come at me unexpectedly --- scenes that are choreographed by happenstance.   Within the frame, the iconography of popular culture sets the stage for fleeting connections that tell little stories of how people navigate gender and racial issues, economic inequality, growing population density, and other social issues with grace. 

Bio

Karen Klugman photographs and writes about the interaction of photography and culture.  Her photographs are in the collections of MOMA, Dansforth Museum, and Davison Art Center.  She was the recipient of two Connecticut Artist’s Grants as well as a Golden Light Award from Maine Photographic Workshop.   She has co-authored and contributed photographs to two books of critical essays about American culture --- “Inside the Mouse; Work and Play in Disney World” and “Strip Cultures: Finding America in Las Vegas” –-and the photo essay “A Bad Hair Day for G.I. Joe.”

She taught photography and was Arts Department Chair at Hopkins School in New Haven.  On days when she is not walking her dog in the woods in Guilford, Connecticut  she may be hiking somewhere else in the world.


Memorial To the Victims of War & Fascism, Vienna, 2015 ©William Bullard

Memorial To the Victims of War & Fascism, Vienna, 2015 ©William Bullard

William Bullard

Artist Statement

My current project brings a life-long interest in street photography – particularly its tradition of portraying a fleeting human moment within the abstract geometry of an urban space – into art museums and public monuments.  Using the works themselves, and the lighting, geometry, and surfaces of these carefully designed sets as a kind of impromptu studio or stage, I am endeavoring to reveal the silent but complex drama that unfolds in these spaces. As I hope these few images suggest, there is irony, humor, and often profound emotion in these encounters.  Just as a well-designed stage mirrors the inner life of the actor, these photographs attempt to compose a space that uncovers and respects the emotional experience of museum visitors as they witness – and sometimes ignore – powerful works of art.  

Bio

A keen photographer since childhood, William Bullard was first inspired by his grandfather’s stereoscopic slides, which often won prizes from camera clubs in the San Francisco Bay Area.  During high school and college, he was moved by the work and daybooks of Edward Weston and so spent a whole summer’s earnings on a 4x5 view camera and moved to Paris for a year, where he photographed the Marais before its demolition and then hitchhiked throughout Europe, lugging his equipment in a jury-rigged canvas backpack.  In the ‘70s and ‘80s, he taught English and photography in New Jersey and ran a small side business out of the school’s darkroom doing portraiture and event photography.  He then spent most of the ‘90s and ‘00s teaching in San Francisco, where I embarked on a long project photographing the roadscapes of the Point Reyes Peninsula.  In 2007 his wife and he moved to New York City to continue their professions in independent schools and bought an old farmhouse in Columbia County.  He has since devoted himself to forms of street photography, both in the city and in small towns upstate. 

As befits his divided urban and rural life, He is currently working on two projects – this street series portraying visitors to museums and public monuments and the other focused on sheep farming in the Hudson Valley and northwest England, particularly as it involves how the 4-H clubs here – and the “young handlers” in England – inspire and prepare the next generation of farmers.

He has been fortunate over the past 10 years to have been published frequently in Black & White Magazine and to have participated in many group shows, both in New York and regionally throughout the United States.  “Pictures at an Exhibition,” from which these images are drawn, was recently showcased with an interview in Inspired Eye #53, a global online magazine devoted to street photography.


Shine 'm Up, San Francisco, 2017 ©Mark Coggins

Shine 'm Up, San Francisco, 2017 ©Mark Coggins

Mark Coggins

Artist Statement

These photographs were taken during two trips to Japan (in 2015 and 2017) and in my home city of San Francisco. The settings for the Japanese images were:

Although my serious interest in photography began with a multi-year immersion in large format film photography where I took mostly landscapes and still lifes with a heavy 4x5 view camera, I have evolved into a street photographer who relies on a lightweight digital rangefinder. In spite of the near 180-degree reversal in equipment, medium and subject, I believe the training in large format has given me a deeper appreciation of composition, depth of field and exposure that is quite beneficial in making my images.

In deciding where to aim my camera, I look for groups of people interacting or engaged in a common activity, rather than individual subjects. As a photographer who has also published six novels, I am perhaps drawn to tableaus that suggest or hint at a story. Take, for example, the image “Geisha Confidential.” How did the two geisha come to be in the cab in the middle of the night? What is the topic of their (seemingly) urgent conversation?

The desire to tell a story may also influence my style: I like sharply focused images with a full tonal range, pulling in as much detail as I can in the shadows. Most all my work is black and white with a colder toning. These choices tend to echo the approach of documentary filmmakers and photojournalists looking to capture a scene in detail without the distraction of color.

Both the desire to tell a story and the urge to tell it with a clean, crisp image might be best summed up in the quote “f/8 and be there,” attributed to famous New York photojournalist and street photographer Arthur “Weegee” Fellig. f/8 as a f-stop setting suggests good depth of field and sufficient exposure for sharp image, and “being there” implies putting oneself in the right place at the right time to capture a compelling interaction.

Whatever my subject and style choices, I hope my photographs convey the energy, communal bonds, and in some cases, inherent mystery and alienation of urban life.

Bio

Mark Coggins is both a photographer and an author.  His images have been used to illustrate his own novels as well as the books of other writers, notably Patricia Cornwell’s Red Mist (end papers) and Roland Barthes’s A Lover's Discourse: Fragments (cover photograph).

The Chicago Tribune said of his photography, "People like to put a story to the art they look at. That aspect really comes across in the work. We can see where the two aspects of his life [author and photographer] really complement each other."


Jews in New York #15, New York, 2015 ©Natsuko Matsumura

Jews in New York #15, New York, 2015 ©Natsuko Matsumura

Natsuko Matsumura

Artist Statement

I believe that the physicality of using films and processing and printing by my own hands brings my emotions into the fine prints the most. My images call for the self-awareness as well as the social awareness of human existence in a lonely way. I have become interested in taking pictures of people on the street from distance to capture their natural behaviors and the feeling of separation and observation.

Coming from Japan where it has traditions and rules, I have been struggled to deal with my nationality and tradition versus being free in a different country and culture especially in the mixed cultures of New York City. I reflect this uneasy feeling in my current 3-year project “Jewish People in New York”. I found that Jewish culture was similar to Japanese and look at it from outside as looking my own culture from distance. 

Bio

Natsuko Matsumura is a multimedia artist from Japan who mainly focuses on fine art street photography and printmaking. Natsuko currently lives and works in New York. Her works come from a struggle of her identity. Her works call for self-awareness as well as the social awareness of human existence in a sad /lonely way. Her works, which deal with observations of people’s existence and behavior, evoke the feeling of isolation. Coming from Japan where it has traditions and rules, she has been struggled to deal with her nationality and tradition versus being free in a different country and cultures especially in the mixed cultures of New York. Conveying these uneasy feelings, which can’t be explained by words, is important to her. She believes that her feelings, thoughts, and energies are conveyed in her artwork through long process of printmaking or film photography. She earned her BFA in photography at Hunter College. After graduation, she continued to study photography in a darkroom under photographer Francisco Bravo. Her works are in private collections and Zayed University in Dubai permanent collection. Her works have been selected for several group shows.

 

NATIONAL JURIED PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION
FACES OF STREETS / William Bullard, Mark Coggins, Karen Klugman, Natsuko Matsumura

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